Tuesday, 25 of July of 2017

Can Diet Make A Difference With Osteoarthritis?

 

 

We’ve all heard about a heart-healthy diet to reduce your risk of cardiovascular disease. But what about osteoarthritis? Is there an “arthritis diet” that will make a difference in alleviating the pain, stiffness and swelling associated with chronic joint disease?

Healthy Diet

An article in the November issue of Arthritis Today, reports that yes, a balanced, nutritious diet does make a difference when it comes to managing osteoarthritis and may even reduce your risk of developing it. What type of diet is best? One that emphasizes plant-based foods, says Ruth Frenchman, a spokesperson for the American Dietetic Association, who is quoted in the Arthritis Today article. Here are some of her suggestions for a joint-friendly diet:

*Small portions are the key. As you get older you need to eat less to stay the same weight. Maintaining a healthy weight reduces stress on the joints. You can also cut down on extra calories by avoiding sugary foods and limiting carbohydrates.

*Two-thirds of your daily diet should come from fruits, vegetables and whole grains. How much is enough? The recommended daily serving of fresh, frozen or dried fruit for the average adult is one-and-a-half to two cups. But be careful of fruit juice, which is high in sugar. For vegetables, here is the rule of thumb: eat two to three cups of vegetables daily, preferably dark green and orange vegetables, such as spinach, broccoli, greens, sweet potatoes, carrots and squash.

*Choose whole grains and lean, low-fat meat, poultry and fish, or dried beans, peas, nuts and seeds.

*Add low-fat or no-fat calcium-rich dairy products to help maintain strong bones. A total of three cups of cheese, milk or yogurt daily is recommended. Keep in mind that one-and-a-half ounces of cheese equal one cup of milk.

But it’s not only eating healthy that is important; maintaining an appropriate weight for your body type is also essential. Did you know that each pound you gain adds nearly four pounds of extra stress to your knees and increases pressure on the hips six-fold? The extra weight can eventually damage the cartilage that cushions and protects the joints, especially in the hips and knees. 

The Arthritis Foundation also reports that new research is showing a potential link between diabetes, blood sugar and joint damage – yet another reason to eat healthy and manage your weight. High blood sugar levels may trigger inflammation and “cause the formation of certain molecules that make cartilage stiffer and more sensitive to mechanical stress.”

Dr. Kagan and his staff certainly recommend eating a nutritious diet, keeping your weight down and making sure that you exercise regularly. But despite your best intentions, osteoarthritis may affect your quality of life. If chronic joint pain begins to limit your day-to-day activity level, we are here to help. Call us at 239-936-6778 or go to www.kaganortho.com for more information.


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