Wednesday, 22 of November of 2017

What Are Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs?

 

 

shutterstock_163544123Happy Thanksgiving from Dr. John Kagan and staff to all of our patients and their families. We are grateful for the support we have received from the Southwest Florida community for more than three decades. In this week’s blog we address Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs), which are the most frequently prescribed medication on the market today for people with osteoarthritis, bursitis and tendonitis. NSAIDs relieve pain, reduce swelling and inflammation, and help lower fevers.

Most people know NSAIDs by their brand name, such as Advil, Motrin, ibuprofen, Aleve, Ecotrin and aspirin, all of which are available over the counter without a prescription. A higher-dose strength NSAID is available by prescription only. These medications include Celebrex, Naprosyn, Voltaren, among others. NSAIDs are very effective and considered reasonably safe, but there are potential side effects to consider.

According to the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons, NASIDs work by preventing an enzyme in the body called COX from doing its job. One form of the enzyme, COX-2 (cyclooxygenase), is created when a joint is inflamed or injured. But another form of the enzyme, COX1, protects the lining of the stomach from digestive acids. Blocking this protection can increase the risk of stomach pain and bleeding, heartburn and ulcers.

In addition, NSAIDs reduce the blood-clotting ability of the blood, which may be positive for some people, but could be harmful to others. Be sure to talk with your doctor before taking an NSAID if you already take a blood-thinning medication such as Coumadin for heart disease. A warning label appears on every NSAID bottle or package that cautions about the increased risk for heart attack, high blood pressure, stroke or stomach bleeding in certain people who take the drugs. NSAIDs may also cause a severe allergic reaction in some people, as well as interfere with liver or kidney function.

To reduce any potential complication, talk with your doctor about whether NSAIDs are right for you and the dose that is best. In general:

1) Take the lowest dose of NSAID that brings pain relief.

2) Don’t take NSAIDs longer than is necessary and take only the dosage prescribed for you.

3) Be sure to let the doctor know about any pre-existing medical conditions you may have, such as high blood pressure, asthma, or a history of ulcers, kidney or liver disease, heart attack or stroke – as well as other medications that you may be taking that could interfere with NSAIDs.

If you have any questions or concerns, do not hesitate to call of our office at 239-936-6778. For more information about orthopedic-related conditions and treatment, go to www.kaganortho.com.


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