Thursday, 21 of September of 2017

Category » Bone Health

National Men’s Health Week

 

 

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This Sunday, June 16, Dr. Kagan and staff will join families across the country in celebrating Father’s Day and thanking Dads – or other significant men in our lives, such as grandparents, step-fathers, uncles, teachersand mentors – for all they have done and continue to do for us.

This week, June 10-16, is also National Men’s Health Week and a perfect time to remind men to adopt healthier lifestyle habits, including eating healthy, exercising more, maintaining appropriate weight, not smoking and making sure they have an annual check-up with their physician.

Early detection is the key to preventing many illnesses and even has a role to play in greater awareness about orthopedic-related issues that affect men. As boomers push the boundaries for active, healthy aging, men of all ages are enjoying exercising, staying fit and participating in sports. This is a very positive trend, but at the same time, can put men at risk for sports-related overuse injuries that strain ligaments and tendons and stress joints and damage cartilage. Remind Dad to go easy on the joints and not ignore acute or chronic pain and tenderness.

Shoulder, hip and knee arthroscopic surgery are among the top 10 successful procedures in the U.S. every year. These procedures can be life-changing in reversing mobility and improving quality of life.

For more information about bone and joint health, visit www.kaganortho.com.


Study Reported At AAOS Meeting Highlights Total Knee Success

 

 

shutterstock_137018378For people who suffer from the chronic, crippling pain of severe osteoarthritis in their knee, life can be a challenge. Even walking or getting out of the car can be difficult. The pain can be bad enough to be disabling, limiting patients’ ability to work or stay physically fit through biking, dancing, tennis, golf or swimming.

Over the past two decades, knee replacement has been the gold standard for relieving pain and restoring mobility. But not as much was known about how the surgery impacted younger active adults who were still working. Now a new study reported this past spring at the 2013 annual meeting of the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons confirms the surgery’s benefits in all arenas of life.

The study, appropriately titled, “Do Patients Return to Work after Total Knee Arthroplasty?“ surveyed 660 patients ages 18 to 60 from one to three years after their surgery. The results? Ninety-eight percent of the patients were able to return to work, ranging from sedentary office jobs to those that involved heavy physical labor.

These results are impressive, especially since the AAOS reports that “more than one in four Americans have bone or joint health problems making these medical conditions the greatest cause of lost work days in the U.S.”

“We can now confirm that knee replacement is successful in keeping patients in the workforce and in preventing the pain and suffering that leads to loss of employment,” said the lead researcher in the study. “Returning patients back to work not only gives the patient a sense of fulfillment, but also is economically beneficial to society.”

Knee replacement is one of the most frequently performed procedures for chronic osteoarthritic pain in the knee. For more information about the surgery, or to schedule an appointment, call our office at 239-936-6778 or visit www.kaganortho.com/learn-more. 


Maintaining Strong Bones

Orthopedic surgeons specialize in the bones, muscles, ligaments, tendons and other connective tissues that make up the musculoskeletal system.  Good nutrition, exercise and healthy lifestyle habits can help maintain the strength and integrity of the muscles and bones throughout your lifetime.

According to the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons, “bones can definitely get stronger or weaker over time, depending on how we take care of them.”  Here are some suggestions for keeping bones healthy and strong.

#1  The Benefits of Exercise

Just as exercise strengthens and tones muscles, it also increases the density and strength of bones. The best exercise plan combines:  1) weight-bearing activities such as walking, jogging, tennis, dancing and soccer; 2)  strength training, such as lifting weights and doing push ups, and 3)  flexibility and balance such as yoga and tai chi, or simple stretching exercises.

Thirty minutes of exercise four days a week is ideal, but even a 10-minute brisk walk offers major benefits.  Cross-train by alternating different types of exercise each day and remember that repetitive exercise can overstress the joints and make you more prone to injury as well as degenerative conditions such as osteoarthritis.

With age, balance can diminish, and make you more susceptible to falls and bone fractures. The AAOS reports that balance training can reduce falls by almost half and the risk of hip fracture by 25 percent. Reduce your risk with a lifetime of appropriate exercise.

#2 Establish Healthy Habits

Practicing healthy lifestyle habits can help maintain bone strength. For example, a healthy diet should include adequate levels of calcium and vitamin D appropriate for your age and gender.  If you smoke, consider kicking the habit as smoking can reduce bone mass.  Moderate your alcohol use; heavy alcohol consumption can  negatively impact bone density.

It’s never too late to take steps to improve bone strength, flexibility and balance. But it’s also true that sometimes, injuries happen. Go to www.kaganmdortho.com/learn-more for more information on orthopedic injuries and how to treat them.


New Medical Study Finds Vitamin D Doesn’t Help Arthritic Knees

Taking vitamin D supplements does not stop the progression of osteoarthritis in the knees, according to a new medical study published this week in the Journal of American Medical Association.

Because of vitamin D’s importance to bone health, it was thought that it might alleviate the pain of osteoarthritis and reduce damage to the cartilage. But results of a two-year study showed this was not the case. Physicians at Boston’s Tufts Medical Center directed the randomized, placebo-controlled trail that evaluated 146 people with advanced osteoarthritis of the knee.

However, there are a number of nonsurgical treatment options, including hyaluronic injections, prolotherapy treatment and platelet rich plasma (PRP) that can help reduce discomfort and improve quality of life for people with chronic knee pain until joint replacement surgery becomes necessary. To learn about these options, go to www.kaganortho.com/learn-more.


What Is MIS Joint Replacement?

The trend toward bigger is better may apply in some areas of popular culture, but definitely not in the field of medicine, especially for joint replacement surgery.

MIS joint replacement is a minimally invasive surgical technique in which the surgical incision used to open the body is very tiny, just 2.5- to 3.5 inches. In contrast, traditional joint replacement surgery calls for a much larger incision – typically 12- to 14-inches.

But here’s the interesting twist. Whether the surgeon uses traditional surgery or a minimally invasive technique, the device used to replace the arthritic hip, knee or shoulder is always a full-size, traditional plastic or metal implant.

How is that possible? Technology.

Standard operating procedure calls for the surgeon to make a large incision and then retract the tissue, giving him a large surgical field in which to operate and insert the new artificial implant.

The new MIS technique uses a completely different approach. First, miniature specialized surgical instruments have been developed that are small enough to inset through a tiny incision.

Then, to overcome the restriction of a dramatically reduced surgical field, the specialized surgical instruments are equipped with a light source and video capability. Video images of the interior structure are sent in real-time to a monitor, giving the surgeon highly magnified 3D images of the operating field.

Performing minimally invasive surgery not only requires the right surgical instruments, it also takes training and certification to learn the surgical skills and manual dexterity required to become proficient in minimally invasive techniques.

In addition, the surgeon has to have a successful practice and track record that allows him to consistently perform the technique to keep his skills up to date and his surgical outcomes good.

Not everyone is a good candidate for MIS joint replacement. But the advantages of this new advance are extensive. The benefits include less blood loss, reduced trauma to the body, fewer days of hospitalization and faster overall recovery. Minimally invasive techniques are definitely a positive trend for the future of orthopedic care.

Want to find out more about minimally invasive techniques to treat joint pain? Go to www.kaganortho.com/learn-more. If you have chronic osteoarthritis that doesn’t respond to nonsurgical treatment, ask your doctor if you a good candidate for MIS joint replacement.

The trend toward bigger is better may apply in some areas of popular culture, but definitely not in the field of medicine, especially for joint replacement surgery.

MIS joint replacement is a minimally invasive surgical technique in which the surgical incision used to open the body is very tiny, just 2.5- to 3.5 inches. In contrast, traditional joint replacement surgery calls for a much larger incision – typically 12- to 14-inches.

But here’s the interesting twist. Whether the surgeon uses traditional surgery or a minimally invasive technique, the device used to replace the arthritic hip, knee or shoulder is always a full-size, traditional plastic or metal implant.

How is that possible? Technology.

Standard operating procedure calls for the surgeon to make a large incision and then retract the tissue, giving him a large surgical field in which to operate and insert the new artificial implant.

The new MIS technique uses a completely different approach. First, miniature specialized surgical instruments have been developed that are small enough to inset through a tiny incision.

Then, to overcome the restriction of a dramatically reduced surgical field, the specialized surgical instruments are equipped with a light source and video capability. Video images of the interior structure are sent in real-time to a monitor, giving the surgeon highly magnified 3D images of the operating field.

Performing minimally invasive surgery not only requires the right surgical instruments, it also takes training and certification to learn the surgical skills and manual dexterity required to become proficient in minimally invasive techniques.

In addition, the surgeon has to have a successful practice and track record that allows him to consistently perform the technique to keep his skills up to date and his surgical outcomes good.

Not everyone is a good candidate for MIS joint replacement. But the advantages of this new advance are extensive. The benefits include less blood loss, reduced trauma to the body, fewer days of hospitalization and faster overall recovery. Minimally invasive techniques are definitely a positive trend for the future of orthopedic care.

Want to find out more about minimally invasive techniques to treat joint pain? Go to www.kaganortho.com/learn-more. If you have chronic osteoarthritis that doesn’t respond to nonsurgical treatment, ask your doctor if you a good candidate for MIS joint replacement.

 


List-Making Can Improve Communication With Your Doctor

Patients today are much more educated about health care thanks to the Internet. But good communication between patients and doctors can still be a problem for many people. Sometimes, patients may feel uncomfortable asking too many questions or they may be intimidated or confused by medical terms.There may be a lot of information to absorb at one visit. Or patients may have more questions once they get home and have time to think about it.

The American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons suggests the best way to avoid any issues with communication is to be prepared by making a list in advance of your visit. You might want to keep your list on the refrigerator, at your desk, by the TV or even in your purse. That way when ideas come to mind, you can jot them down.

What should be included on your list? Here are some ideas:Make a list for your doctor

  • Jot down your symptoms with as much detail as possible; for example, when did they start, when does it hurt the most, is the discomfort constant or is it only at certain times of the day or during certain activities?
  • List all medications, starting with prescription meds, but also including any daily over-the-counter drugs, vitamins, herbal supplements, alternative medications or treatments and of course, any allergies to medications.
  • Summarize your medical history, which should include any surgery or major medical conditions you have had in the past or currently.
  • Write down questions you want to be sure to ask the doctor. Not sure what to ask? It is your right as a patient to ask about: 1) the benefits and risks of surgery, 2) possible complications, 3) treatment alternatives, 4) what you can expect after surgery in terms of recovery time, treatment outcome and level of discomfort after the procedure, and 5) what limitations you may have during recovery and long-term.

How else will help make your visit with the doctor more successful?

  • Bring recent X-rays, CT scans, or MRIs,with you. If you don’t have them, be sure to bring the name of the physician who ordered the tests and his or her contact information.
  • Be honest with the doctor. Don’t withhold information that might be important. Voice any concerns you may have and speak up when you don’t understand. Sometimes it’s a good idea to bring a family member or close friend to help you remember the information after you get home.

Do you have a visit scheduled with Dr. Kagan to discuss an orthopedic-related concern? The doctor offers easy-to-understand information about the latest treatments for orthopedic-related conditions at www.kaganortho.com/learn-more.

 


Staying Flexible As We Age

As the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons (AAOS) notes, while there may be not be a fountain of youth, staying active through regular exercise that promotes stretching and flexibility can offer many anti-aging benefits. Aerobic activity that raises the heart rate is important for fitness and conditioning, but stretching is just as vital for good health.

Gentle exercise stretches the muscles, reduces tightness and tension, and increases blood flow. It promotes flexibility in the joints, which improves our range of motion and can lessen many common aches and pains. The repetitive motion of exercise also promotes the body’s natural process of lubricating joint surfaces, says the AAOS.

Here are additional reasons why stretching and staying flexible is important no matter what your age.

Regular exercise and stretching helps maintain balance, which reduces the risk of falling.

Exercise stimulates muscle growth, counteracting the tendency to lose muscle mass with age. Muscles that are toned and strong reduce stress on the joints.

Stretching improves the flexibility and elasticity of tendons and ligaments, lowering the risk of sports-related injuries.

Exercise increases bone mass, density and overall strength, which may prevent osteoporosis and decrease the potential for fractures later in life.

When stretching, the Mayo Clinic suggests following proper technique for the best results. Perform a low intensity exercise like brisk walking for five to ten minutes to warm up muscles before stretching, making sure that when you are stretching, you don’t bounce or push it until you feel pain, which can cause small muscle tears. Stretch the calves, thighs, hips, lower back, neck and shoulders – the major muscle groups. And remember to stretch both sides of the body equally.

Not all exercise is equal. The AAOS cautions again being a “weekend warrior.” Fast-paced, competitive activity on the weekends only can do more harm than good and can put you on the path for developing injuries ranging from stress fractures to torn or inflamed tendons and ligaments. It’s much better to take a short time every day for gentle stretching and moderate exercise.

Orthopedic surgeons are doctors who specialize in treating musculoskeletal injuries that affect the bones, muscles, ligaments and tendons, joints and cartilage. Dr. John Kagan has more than 20 years experience treating patients of all ages with orthopedic-related conditions. Learn more about his expertise at www.kaganortho.com.


Treating Leg Fractures

A car accident or serious sports injury from being tackled during football, tripping while playing soccer, or snow skiing while on vacation can fracture the shin bone of the lower leg, called the tibia. Depending on the severity of the force, you may sustain a closed or simple fracture where the skin isn’t broken, or an open fracture, also called compound fracture, where the skin is pierced.

Long distance runners are also at risk for a different kind of fracture, a stress fracture. This kind of injury results from overuse – continually pounding the leg and foot on the road, track or sidewalk. Competitive volleyball players can also sustain this type of injury. According to the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons, stress fractures occur when fatigued muscles can no longer absorb the shock of the impact and transfer the “load” to the bone, causing a small crack to appear.

If your shin is broken, or you think you may have a stress fracture, the physician will order an X-ray to confirm the diagnosis and determine the extent of injury. Rest can often heal stress fractures. Other fractures usually require at minimum a cast to realign the bone and allow it to heal. But more serious injuries may need surgery. Orthopedic surgeons use a variety of internal and external fixation devices, including inserting metal plates, pins or screws, fix the fracture and promote healing.

Recovery may take several weeks or months depending on the severity of the break. Once the bone begins to heal, you may need physical therapy to rebuild muscle strength in the leg.

Physician specialists in orthopedics treat severe fractures and other bone and joint conditions. To learn more about these services, go to www.kaganortho.com.


Hip Resurfacing, An Alternative to Total Hip Replacement Surgery

For people who lead an active, physical lifestyle and enjoy participating in vigorous recreational activities such as running, tennis and racquetball, hip resurfacing may be an alternative to traditional total hip replacement surgery.

There are several key advantages to hip resurfacing, including greater range of motion and less risk of dislocating the hip. In addition, should future hip revision surgery be needed, it may be easier to perform the procedure after hip resurfacing than if the patient has received a traditional total hip replacement.

What’s the difference between the two?

During a total hip replacement procedure, the entire joint is removed. This includes the head of the thighbone, called the femoral head, as well as any diseased or damaged bone and cartilage within the socket. The original disease joint is then replaced with an artificial implant.

In contrast, hip resurfacing is considered a bone-conserving procedure. The femoral head is not removed. Instead a few centimeters of bone are trimmed from the surface of the femoral head, which is then capped with a smooth metal covering. The implant fits into this covering.

According to the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons, the best candidates for hip resurfacing are people less than 60 years old who have a large frame and strong, healthy bones. The procedure may be less successful for people who are elderly or small-framed, and those who have weak or damaged bones.

For more information on both hip resurfacing and total hip replacement, go to www.kaganortho.com

 


4 Components of a Good Exercise Program

Many people think of fitness only in terms of strength training and cardio, but flexibility and balance are critical, too. Here’s a look at what each of these four components bring to a well-rounded fitness program.

Strength Training: Resistance machines, lifting weights, pushups, sit-ups and pull-ups strengthen the bones and muscles, sculpt the body and decrease body fat. Core strength training, which refers to the muscles of the abdomen, lower back and pelvis, keeps the back strong and prevents injury.

Cardio: The vigorous, sustained action of aerobic exercise increases the heart rate, making the heart more efficient, and it improves the body’s ability to deliver oxygen and energy to the tissues. Swimming, running, dancing, brisk walking, climbing stairs, tennis and bicycling are good cardiovascular exercises.

Flexibility: Regular stretching improves muscle and joint flexibility, reduces tension in the body and enhances range of motion. Yoga and tai chi are good choices to improve flexibility. Always stretch with a gentle warm-up and cool down after any type of exercise to reduce the risk of injury.

Balance: Balance training improves the body’s stability and reduces the risk of falling, especially as we age. Our sense of balance can diminish over time so be sure balance exercises are part of your overall fitness plan.

For more information on maintaining healthy muscles and bones, please call 239-936-6778 or visit http://www.kaganortho.com



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