Thursday, 21 of September of 2017

Tag » bone health

Orthopedic Conditions Specific to Women

 

 

 

shutterstock_107013878 copyIn honor of Mother’s Day this Sunday, May 12, Dr. John Kagan and his staff join families everywhere in recognizing and appreciating the vital role mothers play in our lives. It’s also the perfect time to discuss the type of orthopedic injuries that women are more at risk for than men, primarily due to biomechanical and structural differences.

According to the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons, studies show women have a greater tendency to develop ACL injuries, patellofemoral pain syndrome,  also called runner’s knee, as well as stress fractures. In addition, women are at higher risk for hip fractures with advancing age. Here’s an overview of each of these conditions.

The ACL is a rubber-band like connecting tissue that attaches the bone in the upper leg (the femur) with the bone in the lower leg (the tibia). The ACL stabilizes the knee. Women athletes tend to have more ACL injuries primarily because they put greater stress on their knee due to several factors – their knees more frequently  “turn in” toward the body than men; women tend to jump and run with the feet in a more rigid position; and they bend their knees less when jumping and landing.

Patellofemoral pain in the knee usually occurs at the front of the knee, with women complaining of burning or aching especially when bending, squatting, running or climbing stairs. Like ACL pain, this condition is also related to structural differences in women’s bodies, such as greater pelvis width and muscle imbalances or misalignment.

Stress fractures are usually related to overuse but may also be a consequence of poor bone density. The AAOS reports that a stress fracture occurs when the muscles become over-fatigued and transfer the stress to the bone, which can cause tiny cracks in the bone. Most stress fractures occur in the lower leg or foot. Athletic activities in which the foot continually strikes the ground, such as running, tennis, basketball and gymnastics place women at higher risk for stress fractures.

Hip fractures are a serious concern for the elderly, in particular women age 80 and over. According to the Mayo Clinic, menopause can accelerate bone loss, increasing the risk of weak, brittle bones. Muscle mass also decreases with.

The best prevention for sports injuries is to avoid overdoing it. If pain develops, take a break from the activity and ice the injury.  If pain persists, call the doctor for an evaluation to prevent chronic, long-term problems. Proper training and strengthening exercises can be beneficial in correcting imbalances.

To keep bones healthy no matter what your age, the best prevention is to stay active, eat a healthy diet and continue to exercise appropriately.

For more information about orthopedic-related injuries and the treatment options, go to www.kaganortho.com. 


Maintaining Strong Bones

Orthopedic surgeons specialize in the bones, muscles, ligaments, tendons and other connective tissues that make up the musculoskeletal system.  Good nutrition, exercise and healthy lifestyle habits can help maintain the strength and integrity of the muscles and bones throughout your lifetime.

According to the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons, “bones can definitely get stronger or weaker over time, depending on how we take care of them.”  Here are some suggestions for keeping bones healthy and strong.

#1  The Benefits of Exercise

Just as exercise strengthens and tones muscles, it also increases the density and strength of bones. The best exercise plan combines:  1) weight-bearing activities such as walking, jogging, tennis, dancing and soccer; 2)  strength training, such as lifting weights and doing push ups, and 3)  flexibility and balance such as yoga and tai chi, or simple stretching exercises.

Thirty minutes of exercise four days a week is ideal, but even a 10-minute brisk walk offers major benefits.  Cross-train by alternating different types of exercise each day and remember that repetitive exercise can overstress the joints and make you more prone to injury as well as degenerative conditions such as osteoarthritis.

With age, balance can diminish, and make you more susceptible to falls and bone fractures. The AAOS reports that balance training can reduce falls by almost half and the risk of hip fracture by 25 percent. Reduce your risk with a lifetime of appropriate exercise.

#2 Establish Healthy Habits

Practicing healthy lifestyle habits can help maintain bone strength. For example, a healthy diet should include adequate levels of calcium and vitamin D appropriate for your age and gender.  If you smoke, consider kicking the habit as smoking can reduce bone mass.  Moderate your alcohol use; heavy alcohol consumption can  negatively impact bone density.

It’s never too late to take steps to improve bone strength, flexibility and balance. But it’s also true that sometimes, injuries happen. Go to www.kaganmdortho.com/learn-more for more information on orthopedic injuries and how to treat them.


New Medical Study Finds Vitamin D Doesn’t Help Arthritic Knees

Taking vitamin D supplements does not stop the progression of osteoarthritis in the knees, according to a new medical study published this week in the Journal of American Medical Association.

Because of vitamin D’s importance to bone health, it was thought that it might alleviate the pain of osteoarthritis and reduce damage to the cartilage. But results of a two-year study showed this was not the case. Physicians at Boston’s Tufts Medical Center directed the randomized, placebo-controlled trail that evaluated 146 people with advanced osteoarthritis of the knee.

However, there are a number of nonsurgical treatment options, including hyaluronic injections, prolotherapy treatment and platelet rich plasma (PRP) that can help reduce discomfort and improve quality of life for people with chronic knee pain until joint replacement surgery becomes necessary. To learn about these options, go to www.kaganortho.com/learn-more.


Three steps to better bone health

In recognition of Bone and Joint Action Week, Oct. 12-20, I’m providing patients and the general public with information on the prevalence of bone and joint conditions, treatment options and ways to improve their bone and joint health.

Bone and joint pain is one of the top reported health problems and a leading cause of severe long-term pain and disability. Given the aging baby boom population, changes in risk factors and increasing life expectancy, bone and joint problems are predicted to increase greatly. Bone and Joint National Action Week presents a great opportunity for physicians to empower patients to participate in decisions about their care and treatment.

Back pain, arthritis, traumatic injuries and osteoporosis are among the various types of orthopaedic conditions. It is estimated that these conditions occur in nearly one in two persons over the age of 18 or about 48 percent of the U.S. population. Although the fragility of bones increases as we get older, there are things you can do to help prevent injury. Below are three steps to help maintain optimal bone density and health:

1. Get your recommended value of Calcium and Vitamin D – Calcium is essential to maintain strong bones and teeth, however, your body does not produce calcium naturally. Instead, calcium must be absorbed from your dietary intake. There are many sources of calcium: green leafy vegetables, milk and other dairy products, salmon, almonds, tofu and any food products fortified with calcium. Vitamin D is important for bone health because it aids the body in absorbing calcium. To get your daily requirement of vitamin D, just step outside in the sun and take a 10-15 minute walk each day.

2. Know your body – If you have had fractures in the past, you’re more likely to have them in the future. Be aware of your body’s limitations and pain threshold.

3. Exercise – It’s crucial to maintain an exercise regime at any age. To maximize bone health, try weight bearing exercises like running, walking or yoga.

As always, consult a physician before taking any medications, vitamin supplements or beginning an exercise regime. For more information on ways to maintain healthy joints and bones or to discuss treatment options, call 239-936-6778 or visit www.Kaganortho.com.


Steps to Better Bones

Although the fragility of bones increases as we get older, there are things you can do to help prevent injury.  Below are three steps that Dr. John Kagan recommends to help your body maintain optimal bone density and health.

  1. Get your recommended value of Calcium and Vitamin D – Calcium is essential to maintain strong bones and teeth, however, your body does not produce calcium naturally. Instead, calcium must be absorbed from your dietary intake. There are many sources of calcium; green leafy vegetables, milk and other dairy products, salmon, almonds, tofu and any food products fortified with calcium. Vitamin D is important for bone health because it aids the body in absorbing calcium. To get your daily requirement of vitamin D, just step outside in the sun and take a 10-15 minute walk each day.
  2. Know your body – If you have had fractures in the past, you’re more likely to have them in the future. Be aware of your body’s limitations and pain threshold.
  3. Exercise – It’s crucial to maintain an exercise regime at any age. To maximize bone health, try weight bearing exercises like running, walking or yoga.

Always consult an orthopaedic specialist before taking any medications, vitamin supplements or beginning an exercise regime for an orthopaedic ailment. For a thorough evaluation of your bone health, or for more information in ways to maintain healthy bones, call 239-936-6778 or visit www.Kaganortho.com or http://www.leecountyinjuryprevention.org/Pages/default.aspx.



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