Thursday, 21 of September of 2017

Tag » Exercise

How Exercise Can Help Joint Pain

 

 

shutterstock_127325003While joint pain from osteoarthritis may eventually require surgery, before then, it’s a good idea to explore all the non-surgical ways you can decrease discomfort and increase your range of motion. One of the most overlooked options is free, easy to accomplish and effective – exercise.

You might be thinking that exercise is the last thing on your mind if your joints are achy, tender and stiff. In fact, you might be inclined to move as little as possible. But medical experts will tell you that keeping up an appropriate fitness routine is exactly what you should be doing. In fact, Harvard Medical School calls exercise the secret to joint pain relief. It can definitely help improve the quality of your life.

Here’s why. Exercise strengths muscles, tendons and ligaments that hold the joint in place. It allows your body to stretch and be more flexible, helps maintain stronger bones and gives you more energy. It can also help control your weight, or loose weight, which can take pressure of the joints.

You may not be able to doing anything strenuous like run, play tennis or volleyball, but you could walk outside or on a treadmill, swim laps or do water aerobics, ride a bike or just perform stretching exercises at home or the gym. The key is to pace yourself and not overdo it. If you or a loved one is coping with arthritis and unsure which type of exercise is safe for you to perform, ask your doctor for a recommendation. Perhaps you might even consider a few sessions with a physical therapist if you haven’t been active in a while.

For more information about joint pain and treatment options, contact the office of Dr. Kagan at 239-936-6778 or go to www.kaganortho.com.

 


Staying Flexible As We Age

As the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons (AAOS) notes, while there may be not be a fountain of youth, staying active through regular exercise that promotes stretching and flexibility can offer many anti-aging benefits. Aerobic activity that raises the heart rate is important for fitness and conditioning, but stretching is just as vital for good health.

Gentle exercise stretches the muscles, reduces tightness and tension, and increases blood flow. It promotes flexibility in the joints, which improves our range of motion and can lessen many common aches and pains. The repetitive motion of exercise also promotes the body’s natural process of lubricating joint surfaces, says the AAOS.

Here are additional reasons why stretching and staying flexible is important no matter what your age.

Regular exercise and stretching helps maintain balance, which reduces the risk of falling.

Exercise stimulates muscle growth, counteracting the tendency to lose muscle mass with age. Muscles that are toned and strong reduce stress on the joints.

Stretching improves the flexibility and elasticity of tendons and ligaments, lowering the risk of sports-related injuries.

Exercise increases bone mass, density and overall strength, which may prevent osteoporosis and decrease the potential for fractures later in life.

When stretching, the Mayo Clinic suggests following proper technique for the best results. Perform a low intensity exercise like brisk walking for five to ten minutes to warm up muscles before stretching, making sure that when you are stretching, you don’t bounce or push it until you feel pain, which can cause small muscle tears. Stretch the calves, thighs, hips, lower back, neck and shoulders – the major muscle groups. And remember to stretch both sides of the body equally.

Not all exercise is equal. The AAOS cautions again being a “weekend warrior.” Fast-paced, competitive activity on the weekends only can do more harm than good and can put you on the path for developing injuries ranging from stress fractures to torn or inflamed tendons and ligaments. It’s much better to take a short time every day for gentle stretching and moderate exercise.

Orthopedic surgeons are doctors who specialize in treating musculoskeletal injuries that affect the bones, muscles, ligaments and tendons, joints and cartilage. Dr. John Kagan has more than 20 years experience treating patients of all ages with orthopedic-related conditions. Learn more about his expertise at www.kaganortho.com.


Happy New Year, Happy New YOU!

Undoubtedly, the top New Year’s resolutions are focused on exercise, weight loss and staying active. To support these goals, I recommend incorporating exercise into your daily routine. Studies show that regular exercise enhances muscle and joint function, keeps bones strong, and decreases your risk of heart attack and stroke.

Here are some tips developed by the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine and American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons that can help you exercise safely.

Warm Up
Always take time to warm up and stretch before physical activity. Research studies have shown that cold muscles are more prone to injury. Warm up with jumping jacks, stationary cycling or running or walking in place for 3 to 5 minutes. Then slowly and gently stretch, holding each stretch for 30 seconds. Do not stretch cold muscles.

Cool Down
Just like warming up, it is important to cool down. Gentle stretching after physical activity is very important to prepare your body for the next time you exercise. It will make recovery from exercise easier.

Consistent Exercise Program
Avoid the “weekend warrior” syndrome. Compressing your exercise into 2 days sets you up for trouble and does not increase your fitness level. Try to get at least 30 minutes of moderate physical activity every day. If you are truly pressed for time, you can break it up into 10-minute chunks. Remember that moderate physical activity can include walking the dog, working in the garden, playing with the kids and taking the stairs instead of an elevator. Parking on the far end of a parking lot will increase the distance you have to walk between your car and your destination.

Be Prepared
Take sports lessons. Whether you are a beginner or have been playing a sport for a long time, lessons are a worthwhile investment. Proper form and instruction reduce the chance of developing an “overuse” injury like tendinitis or a stress fracture.

Lessons at varying levels of play for many sports are offered by local park districts and athletic clubs.
Invest in good equipment. Select the proper shoes for your sport and use them only for that sport. When the treads start to look worn or the shoes are no longer as supportive, it is time to replace them.

Listen to Your Body
As you age, you may find that you are not as flexible as you once were or that you cannot tolerate the same types of activities that you did years ago. While no one is happy about getting older, you will be able to prevent injury by modifying your activity to accommodate your body’s needs.

Use the Ten Percent Rule
When changing your activity level, increase it in increments of no more than 10 percent per week. If you normally walk two miles a day and want to increase your fitness level, do not try to suddenly walk four miles. Slowly build up to more miles each week until you reach your higher goal. When strength training, use the 10 percent rule as your guide and increase your weights gradually.

Balanced Fitness
Develop a balanced fitness program that incorporates cardiovascular exercise, strength training, and flexibility. In addition to providing a total body workout, a balanced program will keep you from getting bored and lessen your chances of injury.

Add activities and new exercises cautiously. Whether you have been sedentary or are in good physical shape, do not try to take on too many activities at one time. It is best to add no more than one or two new activities per workout.

If you have or have had a sports or orthopedic injury like tendinitis, arthritis, a stress fracture, or low back pain, consult an orthopedic surgeon who can help design a fitness routine to promote wellness and minimize the chance of injury.

For more information on bone and joint health or to discuss your orthopedic care and concerns, please contact our office at 239-936-6778 or visit www.kaganortho.com.



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